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How Can I Make the Home Safer for a Senior with Alzheimer’s?

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Caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s at home is possible, as long as you take safety precautions. You need to remove all hazards and ensure your loved one is secure while inside the house. Here are some ways to increase home safety for a senior parent with Alzheimer’s.

Keep Potentially Dangerous Items Out of Reach

You shouldn’t keep weapons in your loved one’s home, but if you choose to, make sure they’re locked up in a place where he or she has no access. Leaving sharp and dangerous items out in the open could increase your parent’s risk of causing harm to him or herself, you, or others. When cooking, doing home improvements, or working on other tasks that require the use of potentially dangerous tools and objects, make sure your loved one is never left alone with these items. If he or she is helping you with the tasks, you should be the one to handle the sharp utensils and tools to prevent accidents and injuries. 

There are a variety of age-related health conditions that can make it more challenging for seniors to live independently. However, many of the challenges they face can be easier to manage if their families opt for professional senior home care. Oshkosh families can rely on expertly trained caregivers to keep their loved ones safe and comfortable while aging in place.

Clear Out Clutter

Your loved one may forget where particular objects are stored in the home as Alzheimer’s progresses, increasing the risk of bumping into furniture and other harmful items. Help your loved one clear out all clutter regularly, and move things around to make sure there are clear pathways throughout the home. Do a thorough cleaning with your parent at least once per year. During this cleaning, you can throw out items he or she no longer uses. Some personal belongings will have sentimental value, so be considerate of your loved one’s feelings when trying to toss out the objects.

Remove Alcohol

Drinking alcoholic beverages can lead to confusion in seniors with Alzheimer’s disease, which is why you should remove alcohol from your loved one’s home. Even if the beverages are safely secured inside the home, your loved one could break the glass of a cabinet or find the keys to the locks and open the cases to have a drink. When you drink wine, beer, or any other alcoholic beverage, never leave a glass unattended because your loved one could mistake the alcohol for water or juice. 

One of the most challenging tasks of helping an elderly relative age in place safely and comfortably is researching agencies that provide at-home care. Oshkosh families can turn to Home Care Assistance for reliable, high-quality in-home care for aging adults. We offer 24-hour live-in care for seniors who require extensive assistance, and we also offer respite care for family caregivers who need a break from their caregiving duties.

Lock the Doors and Windows

Keeping the front and back doors secure could prevent your loved one from wandering, especially at night. Wandering is a common issue seniors with Alzheimer’s disease experience, which is why all entrances and exits should be locked at all times. Your loved one can go out and enjoy a walk in the neighborhood as long as you or a caregiver accompanies him or her to keep your parent from getting lost. Keeping the doors and windows locked can also lower the risk of someone entering the home without permission. Seniors are often the targets of break-ins and scams because of their age.

Every senior living with Alzheimer’s deserves high-quality Alzheimer’s care. Oshkosh families can rely on the caregivers at Home Care Assistance to keep their loved ones safe while managing the symptoms of the disease. Using our Cognitive Therapeutics Method, our caregivers help seniors regain a sense of pride and accomplishment while promoting cognitive health. Call us today at (920) 710-2273 to learn about our high-quality in-home Alzheimer’s care services.